APtly Said

APtly Said is API’s blog for parents written by parents striving to embrace API’s Eight Principles of Parenting in their families on a daily basis. Posts are provided through a core team of bloggers with guest posts accepted regularly. Contact Rita Brhel, interim editor, for submission guidelines. 

Mar 23, 2019

  I won a 5-day stay at a Hawaiian resort at an API online auction and celebrated an unforgettable 70th birthday with my two daughters. None of us had ever been to Hawaii before, so we excitedly planned our 5-day itinerary. We gave ourselves plenty of time between...
Mar 20, 2019

I was bidding in a past API online auction, just doing my part to help API support more families. Ok, ok, truth be told, supporting my favorite cause (API) was the perfect reason for me to bid (shop!) for things I might not ordinarily even think about. I got some great items and gifts, but maybe you can imagine my surprise when I actually won an exotic trip. I hadn’t expected to win, so I immediately went into parent-mode, wondering all manner of things like: was it even possible to attempt? How would the kids deal with such a long and exotic trip? How would the sleeping arrangements work? What was the food like? Were there enough family activities to keep everyone happy? In other words, how much work would this be for me? Would I get to relax or would I be in constant...
Mar 03, 2019

By Alexis Schrader

Again and again the articles pop up in parenting magazines and blogs- sleep training your baby is fine, they say, because there is no proven medical harm. While you can point to studies’ failed methodology (http://evolutionaryparenting.com/no-stress-in-sleep-training-a-response/), and argue that other studies (https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/moral-landscapes/201112/dangers-crying-it-out)  and medical associations (https://www.aaimhi.org/...

Mar 03, 2019

By Judy Arnall

What is the scientific purpose of attachment parenting? In short, attachment parenting provides the child stress relief. Every child experiences stress and it impacts the body by triggering a stress response. Emotions such as fear, loneliness, sadness, frustration and unhappiness are present in children as young as babyhood. Children’s response to those emotions is usually crying in babies and “acting out,” crying or screaming in toddlers. Young children do not have the executive functioning to “self-sooth” or regulate their own stress response because of the immaturity of the brain’s pre-frontal cortex. They need external “scaffolding” help from an adult. When a caring adult responds to the situation promptly...

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